How Fanboys See Operating Systems

by Joey deVilla on December 16, 2009

how fanboys see operating systems

This article also appears in Global Nerdy.

{ 63 comments… read them below or add one }

Biker Jackets February 21, 2011 at 9:52 am

well linux is the most difficult, but hey you wil finally LEARN how computers work, not wwhich button does what. (and if you are not intrested in that, use a mac. atleast don’t use windows)

Frank April 17, 2011 at 3:35 pm

@ Biker Jackets: Why should I be interested in learning how my computer works? I also am not particularly interested in learning how my smartphone works. I just use the thing. Besides that you do not give me one single reason for not using Windows.

Don't take me seriously June 2, 2011 at 2:32 am

The linux one is pretty much true.

Drowzor June 28, 2011 at 1:25 pm

Pretty true, in each category.

Constantijn Blondel July 22, 2011 at 4:53 am

@Biker Jackets:

*sigh* … No, you do _not_ learn how _computers_ work, when you use Linux, you learn how _Linux_ works.

If you use Windows on a non-consumer basis, you learn how _Windows_ works, which turns out to be a lot more sophisticated under the hood than ABM’ers think.

But then – you can’t really expect that much from those people, since most of ‘em seem too dumb to use Windows, judging from the fact that they are the only ones who always have BSODs, crashes, driver issues, slowdowns, viruses and all those other things most of us, consumers or professionals, haven’t had since at least XP.

Even building LFS (have you done it? have you done it drunk too?) doesn’t teach you much about computers, even though I could heartily recommend it, since it doubles as a nice crash course in OS design, not to mention you can feel über-7331 in comparison with the Gentoo people :)

Get over it. All modern OSes have their place, their pros and their cons. All of ‘em are abstracted away from the actual workings of the computer. If you want to understand how a computer works, take a course on systems architecture or digital electronics. Oh, and while you’re at it, make sure you also get a solid grounding in semiconductor physics.

Lovely cartoon btw :-)

Haywood Jablomi September 3, 2011 at 9:55 pm

The fanboy above likes to tout his opinion as facts. The irony of it.

Web December 9, 2011 at 11:51 am

“If you want to understand how a computer works, take a course on systems architecture or digital electronics. Oh, and while you’re at it, make sure you also get a solid grounding in semiconductor physics.”

Done and………….Done.

It’s true, though, most consumers would accept an electronic tool that works on some sort of black magic that drains your soul and they would be interested in questions like “why does it work?” and “how does it work?”. Because it “doesn’t concern them”

And you think they would care when their computer breaks. Nope. It becomes “let’s find the nearest person who actually took the effort to learn this stuff” without learning how to fix anything for themselves.

Nice thing is, we can reach into their wallets and monopolize the computer troubleshooting industry. It’s not like they’re giving themselves an alternative.

But I would love to go one day without someone’s battery dying followed by the response “can you fix my computer? stupid windows gave it a virus and now it won’t turn on”.

Web December 9, 2011 at 11:55 am

Correction. “…and they WOULDN’T be interested in questions like…”

Someone December 18, 2011 at 8:25 pm

I’d say something like this
Windows on Mac: Unnecesary waste of money
Windows on Linux: Too complicated
Linux on Windows: Limitated
Linux on Mac: Made for rich people who wouldn’t understand linux
Mac on Windows: Just not-working shit
Mac on Linux: What the hell does “linux” mean?

What are linux fanboys? April 15, 2012 at 12:39 am

what’s a linux fanboy?! (what’s linux, anyway? but they sure are messed up)

Teknoloji Blogu September 14, 2012 at 7:53 am

Get over it. All modern OSes have their place, their pros and their cons. All of ‘em are abstracted away from the actual workings of the computer. If you want to understand how a computer works, take a course on systems architecture or digital electronics. Oh, and while you’re at it, make sure you also get a solid grounding in semiconductor physics.

Athletesrun May 7, 2013 at 11:13 pm

So True. I am a Linux fanboy and I hate to admit it, but these are all true.

anonymous November 16, 2013 at 3:59 pm

Atleast Microsoft is kind enough to give you a reacharound

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