awww yisss bread

You might be thinking: Booze? Drugs? Porn? Videogames?

No. It means something even more illicit…

GLUTEN. And pork chops.

Awww yisss.

(But not too much bread. I’m hittin’ the gym, you know.)

Or, to borrow a couple of panels from Kate Beaton’s comics:

kate beaton - motha fuckin bread crumbs

Click the comic to see the source.

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star wars awkward family photo

Found via Imgur. Click to see the source.

And geez, Luke’s doing a killer impression of Emperor Sheev Palaptine “O-face”…

force lightning family photo

Found via Imgur. Click to see the source.

There. Much better.

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gay family values

Editorial cartoon by Andy Marlette. Click to see the source.

Andy Marlette drew the editorial cartoon above in response to a proposed bill that would let privately-owned adoption agencies dodge being considered as discriminating against clients if doing so would “violate [the agencies’] written religious or moral convictions or policies,” the bill reads. Alas, the bill passed yesterday.

The worst part about the bill passing wasn’t that it passed, but this moment when Republican Committee Chair and unmitigated asshole Charles McBurney laughingly cut off 10-year-old Nathaniel Gill’s testimony at a House Judiciary Committee meeting on the issue. Nathaniel is the son of the gay man who successfully toppled Florida’s adoption ban in the courts, and the bill is seen as “revenge” for that. As committee chair, McBurney could’ve given the nervous boy a little more time to complete his testimony, but in true neo-Pharisee fashion, cut him off and snickered as he did so:

It’s as if they’re trying to prove this maxim true:

Conservatism is the dread fear that somewhere, somehow, someone you think is your inferior is being treated as your equal.

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wales place name

Click the photo to see it at full size.

Found via The Lad Bible.

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A tale of two arrests

by Joey deVilla on April 9, 2015

I think Tom Adelsbach’s onto something here…

2 arrests

Click the image to see the tweet it came from.

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How much do you need to make to be middle class in each US state?

Photo: An older neighborhood in Sanford, Florida

An older neighborhood scene in Sanford, Florida. Creative Commons photo by Steven Martin. Click to see the source.

business insider middle class US state tableLast week, Business Insider published an article titled How much you have to earn to be considered middle class in every US state. The meat of the article was contained in the chart pictured on the right (you can click on it to see the original article and the chart at full size).

The problem with the chart is that it’s a graphic. All you can do is read it. You can’t copy-and-paste them so that you can do your own math or check Business Insider’s math; if you want to work with the numbers, you have to a fair bit of typing.

I thought I’d fix that. I opened up a new spreadsheet at typed in the states and corresponding median household incomes listed on Business Insider’s chart, and had the spreadsheet do the rest of the math. Better still, I saved the spreadsheet as a .CSV file so you can import them into your favorite number-crunching tool and have at them.

Table 1: What your household needs to earn to be middle class in each U.S. state

State Median annual household income Median monthly household income Middle class lower bound (two-thirds of median) Middle class upper bound (twice median)
Maryland $ 72,483 $ 6,040 $ 48,564 $ 144,966
Alaska $ 72,237 $ 6,020 $ 48,399 $ 144,474
New Jersey $ 70,165 $ 5,847 $ 47,011 $ 140,330
Hawaii $ 68,020 $ 5,668 $ 45,573 $ 136,040
D.C. $ 67,572 $ 5,631 $ 45,273 $ 135,144
Connecticut $ 67,098 $ 5,592 $ 44,956 $ 134,196
Massachusetts $ 66,768 $ 5,564 $ 44,735 $ 133,536
New Hampshire $ 64,230 $ 5,353 $ 43,034 $ 128,460
Virginia $ 62,666 $ 5,222 $ 41,986 $ 125,332
Minnesota $ 60,702 $ 5,059 $ 40,670 $ 121,404
California $ 60,190 $ 5,016 $ 40,327 $ 120,380
Utah $ 59,770 $ 4,981 $ 40,046 $ 119,540
Colorado $ 58,823 $ 4,902 $ 39,411 $ 117,646
Wyoming $ 58,752 $ 4,896 $ 39,364 $ 117,504
Washington $ 58,405 $ 4,867 $ 39,131 $ 116,810
Delaware $ 57,846 $ 4,821 $ 38,757 $ 115,692
New York $ 57,369 $ 4,781 $ 38,437 $ 114,738
Illinois $ 56,210 $ 4,684 $ 37,661 $ 112,420
Rhode Island $ 55,902 $ 4,659 $ 37,454 $ 111,804
North Dakota $ 55,709 $ 4,642 $ 37,325 $ 111,418
Vermont $ 52,578 $ 4,382 $ 35,227 $ 105,156
Iowa $ 52,229 $ 4,352 $ 34,993 $ 104,458
Pennsylvania $ 52,007 $ 4,334 $ 34,845 $ 104,014
Texas $ 51,704 $ 4,309 $ 34,642 $ 103,408
Wisconsin $ 51,467 $ 4,289 $ 34,483 $ 102,934
Nebraska $ 51,440 $ 4,287 $ 34,465 $ 102,880
Nevada $ 51,230 $ 4,269 $ 34,324 $ 102,460
Kansas $ 50,972 $ 4,248 $ 34,151 $ 101,944
Oregon $ 50,251 $ 4,188 $ 33,668 $ 100,502
South Dakota $ 48,947 $ 4,079 $ 32,794 $ 97,894
Arizona $ 48,510 $ 4,043 $ 32,502 $ 97,020
Michigan $ 48,273 $ 4,023 $ 32,343 $ 96,546
Ohio $ 48,081 $ 4,007 $ 32,214 $ 96,162
Georgia $ 47,829 $ 3,986 $ 32,045 $ 95,658
Indiana $ 47,529 $ 3,961 $ 31,844 $ 95,058
Maine $ 46,974 $ 3,915 $ 31,473 $ 93,948
Montana $ 46,972 $ 3,914 $ 31,471 $ 93,944
Missouri $ 46,931 $ 3,911 $ 31,444 $ 93,862
Idaho $ 46,783 $ 3,899 $ 31,345 $ 93,566
Florida $ 46,036 $ 3,836 $ 30,844 $ 92,072
North Carolina $ 45,906 $ 3,826 $ 30,757 $ 91,812
Oklahoma $ 45,690 $ 3,808 $ 30,612 $ 91,380
Tennessee $ 44,297 $ 3,691 $ 29,679 $ 88,594
Louisiana $ 44,164 $ 3,680 $ 29,590 $ 88,328
South Carolina $ 44,163 $ 3,680 $ 29,589 $ 88,326
New Mexico $ 43,872 $ 3,656 $ 29,394 $ 87,744
Kentucky $ 43,399 $ 3,617 $ 29,077 $ 86,798
Alabama $ 42,849 $ 3,571 $ 28,709 $ 85,698
West Virginia $ 41,253 $ 3,438 $ 27,640 $ 82,506
Arkansas $ 40,511 $ 3,376 $ 27,142 $ 81,022
Mississippi $ 37,963 $ 3,164 $ 25,435 $ 75,926


csv icon
Want this data? Download it! [3 KB CSV file]

How much do you need to make to be middle class in the 50 biggest US metro areas?

Photo: Cass Street bridge and downtown Tampa reflected in the Hillsborough River.

Cass Street Bridge and Downtown Tampa Reflected in the Hillsborough River. Creative Commons photo by Matthew Paulson. Click to see the source.

Yesterday, Business Insider published a similar article, Here’s what you have to earn to be considered middle class in the 50 biggest US cities. Once again, they included a chart, once again, that chart was in graphic format, and once again, I did a little work to make the data more usable. This time, I went straight to their source, the US Census Bureau’s 2013 American Community Survey. After figuring out their crazy user interface, I was able to extract the information I needed and turn it into the table and CSV file below.

Table 2: What your household needs to earn to be middle class in the 50 largest U.S. metropolitan areas

Metropolitan area Total estimated households Median estimated annual household income Middle class lower bound (two-thirds of estimated median) Middle class upper bound (twice estimated median)
New York-Newark-Jersey City,
NY-NJ-PA
7,080,691 $ 65,786 $ 44,077 $ 131,572
Los Angeles-Long
Beach-Anaheim, CA
4,251,495 $ 58,869 $ 39,442 $ 117,738
Chicago-Naperville-Elgin,
IL-IN-WI
3,450,331 $ 60,564 $ 40,578 $ 121,128
Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington,
TX
2,406,092 $ 57,398 $ 38,457 $ 114,796
Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington,
PA-NJ-DE-MD
2,218,312 $ 60,482 $ 40,523 $ 120,964
Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar
Land, TX
2,158,139 $ 57,366 $ 38,435 $ 114,732
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria,
DC-VA-MD-WV
2,133,062 $ 90,149 $ 60,400 $ 180,298
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West
Palm Beach, FL
2,032,438 $ 46,946 $ 31,454 $ 93,892
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell,
GA
1,954,348 $ 55,733 $ 37,341 $ 111,466
Boston-Cambridge-Newton, MA-NH 1,763,437 $ 72,907 $ 48,848 $ 145,814
Detroit-Warren-Dearborn, MI 1,658,085 $ 51,857 $ 34,744 $ 103,714
San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward,
CA
1,654,554 $ 79,624 $ 53,348 $ 159,248
Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, AZ 1,553,429 $ 51,847 $ 34,737 $ 103,694
Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA 1,392,337 $ 67,479 $ 45,211 $ 134,958
Minneapolis-St.
Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI
1,332,110 $ 67,194 $ 45,020 $ 134,388
Riverside-San
Bernardino-Ontario, CA
1,297,675 $ 53,220 $ 35,657 $ 106,440
Tampa-St.
Petersburg-Clearwater, FL
1,139,923 $ 45,880 $ 30,740 $ 91,760
St. Louis, MO-IL 1,105,652 $ 54,449 $ 36,481 $ 108,898
San Diego-Carlsbad, CA 1,093,386 $ 61,426 $ 41,155 $ 122,852
Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, MD 1,037,921 $ 68,455 $ 45,865 $ 136,910
Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, CO 1,035,096 $ 62,760 $ 42,049 $ 125,520
Pittsburgh, PA 988,106 $ 51,291 $ 34,365 $ 102,582
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro,
OR-WA
881,822 $ 59,168 $ 39,643 $ 118,336
Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia,
NC-SC
859,709 $ 51,251 $ 34,338 $ 102,502
Cleveland-Elyria, OH 844,428 $ 49,358 $ 33,070 $ 98,716
Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN 822,005 $ 53,378 $ 35,763 $ 106,756
Kansas City, MO-KS 798,618 $ 56,248 $ 37,686 $ 112,496
Sacramento–Roseville–Arden-Arcade,
CA
792,639 $ 57,027 $ 38,208 $ 114,054
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, FL 780,174 $ 46,962 $ 31,465 $ 93,924
San Antonio-New Braunfels, TX 778,939 $ 51,716 $ 34,650 $ 103,432
Columbus, OH 750,394 $ 54,079 $ 36,233 $ 108,158
Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson,
IN
739,503 $ 51,087 $ 34,228 $ 102,174
Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise,
NV
713,577 $ 51,057 $ 34,208 $ 102,114
Austin-Round Rock, TX 688,938 $ 61,750 $ 41,373 $ 123,500
Nashville-Davidson–Murfreesboro–Franklin,
TN
662,187 $ 51,996 $ 34,837 $ 103,992
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa
Clara, CA
636,628 $ 91,533 $ 61,327 $ 183,066
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport
News, VA-NC
625,540 $ 56,161 $ 37,628 $ 112,322
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis,
WI
622,962 $ 51,957 $ 34,811 $ 103,914
Providence-Warwick, RI-MA 618,975 $ 55,055 $ 36,887 $ 110,110
Jacksonville, FL 516,144 $ 51,495 $ 34,502 $ 102,990
Louisville/Jefferson County, KY-IN 494,276 $ 50,905 $ 34,106 $ 101,810
Oklahoma City, OK 493,315 $ 50,136 $ 33,591 $ 100,272
Memphis, TN-MS-AR 492,311 $ 46,962 $ 31,465 $ 93,924
New Orleans-Metairie, LA 479,366 $ 45,981 $ 30,807 $ 91,962
Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara
Falls, NY
469,897 $ 50,548 $ 33,867 $ 101,096
Richmond, VA 467,399 $ 57,286 $ 38,382 $ 114,572
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, CT 464,315 $ 66,356 $ 44,459 $ 132,712
Raleigh, NC 449,589 $ 61,710 $ 41,346 $ 123,420
Birmingham-Hoover, AL 431,462 $ 48,328 $ 32,380 $ 96,656
Rochester, NY 425,603 $ 51,857 $ 34,744 $ 103,714
Tucson, AZ 391,975 $ 43,824 $ 29,362 $ 87,648


csv icon
Want this data? Download it! [5 KB CSV file]

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Headline: Damn, Florida nature, you scary! / Photo: Bobcat dragging a shark along a beach

Click the photo to see the Circle of Life at full size.

Definitely FloridaWhile going for an evening walk on Vero Beach, photographer John Bailey noticed a bobcat staring into the water. It was watching a shark in the shallows dining on some smaller fish.

You might think that the bobcat would’ve gone for some of the fish the shark didn’t get, but this is Florida, where no idea is a bad one, and where it’s almost the law that your reach should exceed your grasp in high-larious, newsworthy ways.

So the bobcat went for the shark instead…and won. It pounced on the shark, and pulled it onto dry land, where it became clear that it had caught a four-footer. That’s when Bailey snapped this photo.

Because Bailey is from Florida, he decided to get a better shot by moving closer to the hot killer-on-killer action. In the process, he scared off the bobcat, which suddenly let go of the shark and high-tailed it into the nearby woods.

It’s still less scary than Florida Zombie Cat.

Headline: Distance between me and Sharknivorous Florida Bobcat: JUST UNDER 3 HOURS / Image: Google Map showing route from Tampa to Vero Beach

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